USC Gould Search

Faculty in the News
USC Gould School of Law

2021-2022 Academic Year


  • Lee Epstein

    The New York Times

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Lee Epstein

    Lee Epstein was quoted in a story about the six-justice majority on the U.S. Supreme Court, which has handed down decisions with a powerful impact on Americans and is considered by some the most conservative court since 1931. “The data provide stunning confirmation of the Republican-conservative takeover of the Supreme Court,” Epstein said.

  • Franita Tolson

    WisEye

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about the Voting Rights Act and redistricting law. "Even if we could envision a democracy where the independent state legislature doctrine will be enacted in this good faith way, I think 2020 taught us that in the times that the doctrine came up, it was in undemocratic situations," she said.

  • Robin Craig

    The Orange County Register

    July 1, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the push by local House democrats for EPA to strengthen air and water quality rules. Remove all lead service lines from public water systems within a decade at no cost to property owners, set acceptable levels of lead at 5 parts per billion at the tap, and increase testing for lead in water. Such rules are in the works, Craig said. “It becomes a bit of a Catch-22 in the absence of significant federal money to help with the upgrades,” she said, requiring coordinated infrastructure legislation to make it plausible. Note this article is behind a paywall.

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Associated Press

    June 30, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg was quoted in a story about the Catholic "supermajority" on the U.S. Supreme Court, attributed in part to Catholic immigrants' descendants ardently pursuing legal careers, often at Catholic institutions established to help such immigrants assimilate socially and succeed upwardly. “It’s an immigrant story, how Catholics and Jews overcame anti-Catholic and antisemitic resistance and eventually flooded into elite schools,” Stolzenberg said. The story was also posted in The Washington Post.

  • Franita Tolson

    NPR

    June 30, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was quoted in a story about grassroots efforts by election denial influencers using questionable data analysis to inspire citizens to intimidate local elections officials. "It's an existential threat to American democracy," said Tolson. "If the numbers get big enough, it's unclear whether we will survive it." This story was covered on numerous NPR affiliates across the U.S., including the following: NPR & Houston Public Media, Jefferson Public Radio, WFUV, NPR in Kansas City and KPBS Public Media.

  • Jody David Armour

    The Vanguard

    June 29, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about CARE Courts, a policy framework to provide community-based mental health and substance use disorder treatment services to Californians. Armour argued that the idea that “we’re going to fix the broken people that are the stuff that houselessness is made of, because houselessness is not about lack of affordable housing or lack of jobs, for lack of adequate healthcare. It’s about people lacking personal responsibility and we need to teach ’em personal responsibility,” does not work.

  • Ariela Gross

    NBC News

    June 27, 2022

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed about how there's another war between the states coming over abortion. “What we had in the years leading up to the Civil War was a failure of what lawyers call comity, the idea that states will respect other states’ laws,” she said. “That starts to break down when you have these really stark differences over an issue involving a fundamental right, and that’s what happened in the years leading up to the Civil War.”

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Reuters

    June 27, 2022

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was interviewed about how meme stock investors bet on bankrupt Revlon being the next Hertz. "You need a story that, all of a sudden, demand for Revlon is going to increase to such an extent that the company is now worth more than its outstanding debt. I'm not saying it can't happen, but I'm certainly not betting on the stock," he said.

  • Jean Lantz Reisz

    Law360

    June 24, 2022

    Re: Jean Lantz Reisz

    Jean Reisz was interviewed about the 9th Circuit's ruling that the Board of Immigration Appeals erred in not considering all torture risks when it initially decided to send a Salvadorian man back to his country. "The Court's discussion of the agency's misuse of the Attorney General's 2006 decision in Matter of J-F-F- and the Court's guidance on how the aggregation of separate threats must be handled is significant and applicable in many cases involving Convention Against Torture protection," she said.

  • Robert K. Rasmussen

    Reuters

    June 22, 2022

    Re: Robert K. Rasmussen

    Robert Rasmussen was interviewed about how more universities are beginning to offer undergraduate degrees in legal studies, including USC. “This is not law school-lite,” he said. “This is general knowledge for what you would want a smart, educated person to know about the law.” Rasmussen was also cited in ABA Journal, Above the Law, Yahoo and West Virginia's News.

  • Franita Tolson

    Bloomberg Government

    June 22, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about how federal lawsuits from North Carolina, Alabama, and Arkansas test the limits of the Voting Rights Act, the boundaries of state government authority, and the ability of voting rights groups to file racial gerrymandering cases. “These doctrines and approaches in these cases fundamentally reset the rules of the game,” she said. “In 2030 we will live in a completely different world than we lived in in 2020, and 2020 was not favorable to minority voters at all.”

  • Jonathan Barnett

    The Hill

    June 15, 2022

    Re: Jonathan Barnett

    Jonathan Barnett wrote an op-ed about how antitrust populism would shift the U.S. from free market to managed economy. "Antitrust populists seek to deploy antitrust law for redistributive purposes to achieve 'fair' outcomes, sometimes paying little heed to efficiency effects," he wrote. "Ironically, this prioritization of distributive over efficiency concerns is likely to result in regressive effects by preventing firms from realizing maximal efficiencies that can translate into lower prices under competitive discipline."

  • D. Daniel Sokol

    Business Insider

    June 15, 2022

    Re: D. Daniel Sokol

    D. Daniel Sokol co-wrote an op-ed arguing that India can be the next start-up nation. "Given India’s strong university system that fosters both domestic and foreign talent, India enjoys a favorable global position attracting VC investment," he wrote. "For India to succeed in entrepreneurship and innovation requires a healthy relationship of both domestic regulation that encourages growth and that works in partnership with foreign VCs and tech companies."

  • Hannah R. Garry

    BBC

    June 11, 2022

    Re: Hannah R. Garry

    Hannah Garry was interviewed in an article discussing whether the Hague court will be able to judge Putin for war crimes in Ukraine. “In such criminal cases, we often say that the court is patient. And that there is no statute of limitations for such crimes. And if the leaders of the highest level, for example Putin, can lose power, if the political winds change, in the future, perhaps it can be transferred We have already seen this happen to world leaders," she said. Hannah Garry was also cited in Russian. Please note that the linked article is in Ukranian.

  • Thomas Lenz

    KALW Your Legal Rights

    June 8, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about basic labor law rights in the workplace. "We're really dealing with, in many instances, individual rights versus group rights," he said. "Increasingly, the legal rule involving workplace issues has been deemed employment law but labor law is still there."

  • Abby K. Wood

    Roll Call

    June 2, 2022

    Re: Abby K. Wood

    Abby Wood was interviewed about how the new debate over gun laws will test the gun lobby’s influence. “My impression of all of this is that people really are pretty supportive of reasonable gun control and that the policies just don’t reflect public opinion,” she said. “It feels like a pretty unstable place to be, but we’ve been here for a while.”

  • Jody David Armour

    CBS Los Angeles

    June 1, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the interim report released by the California Reparations Task Force. "This is an important moment for us collectively because if we don't share a common truth, we can't share a common purpose," he said.

  • Michael Simkovic

    Forbes

    May 23, 2022

    Re: Michael Simkovic

    Michael Simkovic was cited about Stanley Surrey’s decision to exclude the realization requirement from his tax expenditure budget. “Many scholars have described realization as the Achilles’ heel of the income tax,” he wrote. “Modern advocates of wealth taxes wish to plug the gaping hole in the income tax blown open by the realization requirement.”

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law 360

    May 20, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was quoted in a story about Apple Store union organizers hoping to be as successful in unionizing as Starbucks workers. He said employers need to be aware of how fast news travels between different store locations. "It is completely foreseeable that employees in vastly different locations will be in touch and tracking what's going on and perhaps trying to coordinate their efforts in the best way to get a win if they're seeking representation," Lenz said. Story is behind paywall.

  • Elyn Saks

    Law360

    May 18, 2022

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was quoted in a story on state bar questionnaires that include questions about mental health, with some states deciding to eliminate such questions. "It may be that things are changing around the mental health story, and it may even be that COVID is helpful," she said. "It's kind of a silver lining that more people have experienced anxiety and depression and fear because of COVID, and may be able to empathize more with people who feel those things because of conditions." Story is behind paywall.

  • Franita Tolson

    CNN

    May 17, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was quoted in a story about a lawsuit alleging a fraudulent scheme to put forward an alternate slate of fake electors for Donald Trump. Tolson cast doubt on how successful the suit might be. “In reality, the fraudulent electors caused damage to Wisconsin as a polity rather than to these particular plaintiffs, making it unlikely that a court will find that they have standing to bring this lawsuit,” she said.

  • Robin Craig

    Engadget

    May 17, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed for a story about a trend in state bans on gas-powered lawn equipment and the best electric alternatives for different types of landscaping needs. "I think that the easier the manufacturers make it for other states to adopt the same sort of ban, the more states will do it," she said.

  • Emily Ryo

    Los Angeles Times

    May 11, 2022

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed about how immigration shortfalls, like soaring housing prices, are fueling California’s population drop. “A whole assortment of the service sector area has been tremendously affected by a lack of immigrant labor that we haven’t really seen and is just really unprecedented,” she said. “Immigrant labor has been a huge part of the long-term home care sector, and a decline in the population in California has had a significant effect.”

  • Ariela Gross

    San Francisco Chronicle

    May 9, 2022

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed about how if Roe is overturned, it might mark the first time the Supreme Court declared an individual right and then took it back. "It's a pretty unprecedented reactionary destruction of a right women and families have relied on for a half century," she said. This article is behind a paywall.

  • Ariela Gross

    The Boston Globe

    May 7, 2022

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed about the potential end of the Chief Justice John Roberts court. "We are seeing a court more conservative than we've seen in 100 years," she said. "If this marks Roberts' counting as a liberal, we're in some kind of house of mirrors." This article is behind a paywall

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    May 5, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the shocking results of the Amazon union vote. "There are efforts to find a leading theme in all of this, but what happens in each location is going to be based on granular details at each location and it may be hard to draw a consistent principle from any of these election results," he said. This article is behind a paywall.

  • Abby K. Wood

    Law.com

    May 3, 2022

    Re: Abby K. Wood

    Abby Wood was interviewed about the SCOTUS abortion opinion leak. “I think that the substance of the leak, which shows that the court is going against the majority of the country, is much more damaging to the legitimacy than the leak itself,” she said

  • Robin Craig

    InsideEPA.com

    May 2, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the risks in the EPA bid For authority. The easiest place for EPA to find cumulative authority is under Superfund law, which she notes is a cleanup statute rather than a permitting one like the air and water laws, so it “makes a certain amount of sense,” she said. This article is behind a paywall.

  • Edward McCaffery

    KPCC Take Two

    May 2, 2022

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Ed McCaffery was interviewed about the concept of 'buy, borrow, die.' "We're not talking about anything illegal that Elon Musk is doing. Anyone can do it with the catch that you have to have wealth, which of course most Americans don't have." McCaffery was interviewed on the same topic by Forbes.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Game Developer

    April 28, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about Epic Games being hit by NLRB discrimination complaint by a former job applicant. "Since NLRB does not initiate charges, it is required that someone come forward to file a charge and to present supporting evidence on the allegations raised," he said. "It may be relevant that someone else raised similar allegations but it does not necessarily mean that NLRB causes a charge to be filed or scope of investigation to expand."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Chronicle of Philanthropy

    April 25, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    A commitment of $13 million from alumnus Richard Chernick and his wife Karla to support the law school’s building fund endowment was included in The Chronicle of Philanthropy's roundup of notable gifts.

  • Jody David Armour

    FOX 11 Los Angeles

    April 24, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour reflected on the LA riots on their 30 year anniversary. "I can remember the day, the time and the weather. That's how vivid it was. It was one of those moments," he said. "The [Rodney King] verdict was jaw-dropping. Black America was being gaslighted because this was a jury that said 'we don't see anything in this video that crosses the line. It seemed like there was ocular proof of wrongdoing, and yet, much of American didn't see it that way." Armour was interviewed on the same topic by Yahoo! News and Microsoft News.

  • Robin Craig

    KCBS Radio

    April 24, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about a Florida real estate developer who is being sued by a lake. "Nature itself should have its own right to exist and should be able to be in federal court to protect itself," she said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz

    April 18, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about a bill to reduce the typical workweek from 40 hours to 32 hours. The legislation “may create cost and operational hurdles for employers struggling to meet staffing goals,” he said, adding that, should the legislation pass, employers with over 500 employees might consider scaling back their operations “to minimize risk and potential exposure.”

  • John Matsusaka

    Star Tribune

    April 15, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was interviewed about why Minnesotans can't bypass the Legislature to change state laws. "The short answer why Minnesota does not have the initiative process is that it isn't in the state's Constitution," he said. "Which begs the question why it isn't in the Constitution. In order for it to be in the state Constitution, the legislature would have to propose it. In general, legislators do not like citizen initiatives, so they are rarely willing to give voters the option."

  • Dorothy S. Lund

    Los Angeles Times

    April 15, 2022

    Re: Dorothy S. Lund

    Dorothy Lund was interviewed about Elon Musk's view on free speech on social media. “Does Elon Musk know what’s good for democracy? I’m not sure. How do we know he’s not just making these arguments to benefit himself?” Lund said. “Usually you don’t have buyers who are so immune to financial consequences.”

  • Elyn Saks

    Female First

    April 14, 2022

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was mentioned in an article about the TV show, Perception. "My biggest help came from Dr Elyn Saks, who is herself a brilliant college professor living with schizophrenia," the article wrote. "Her book, 'The Center Cannot Hold' was my bible when it came to finding depth and truth in my performance."

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The Jewish Chronicle

    April 14, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book American Shtetl, co-authored by David N. Myers, was cited in an article about Kiryas Joel, an American shtetl. Kiryas Joel is “a self-standing, homogenous, Yiddish-speaking shtetl that became a legal municipality recognised by the state; a vision long fantasized by utopians and novelists, but without precedent in European history," she wrote.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    April 12, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how Amazon's challenges to a union's win in a representation election at a Staten Island warehouse will kick off lengthy and contested litigation. "These are very aggressive objections and given that the number of voters who actually cast ballots compared to the number of eligible voters is so strikingly different, there is, I think, a big question about disenfranchisement," he said.

  • Emily Ryo

    Daily Trojan

    April 11, 2022

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed about a study she co-authored that found significant group disparities in naturalization based on applicants’ race, ethnicity, gender and religion. “What really surprised me was just how scarce, or maybe I should say, nonexistent, administrative data was in this area,” she said. “For example, we just couldn’t even find any individual-level data that was available that would allow us to look at agency decisions to approve or deny naturalization applications.”

  • John Matsusaka

    Oklahoma City Free Press

    April 9, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was interviewed about a package of bills that could make it more difficult for state questions to pass or be voted on. “The way I see it, this will just make everything more expensive,” he said. “And it could really make it where only really rich people or groups will be able to use this process.”

  • USC Gould School of Law

    NBC News

    April 7, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Heidi Rummel was cited in an article about Sacramento County DA Anne Marie Schubert's run for California attorney general as gun violence surges. “There is no easy answer to the violence that plagues communities,” she said. “We should work together to address root causes rather than finger point for political gain.”

  • Thomas Lenz

    Game Developer

    April 7, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about how Activision Blizzard is making over a thousand QA contractors full-time employees. Implementing compensation changes in the midst of a unionization is "very complex," he said.

  • Sarah Gruzas

    LLM Guide

    April 6, 2022

    Re: Sarah Gruzas

    Sarah Gruzas was interviewed for an article arguing that diversity of thought is essential to generating effective solutions for today’s unique problem. “It makes sense that law firms and other employers would seek diverse candidates and those with a variety of skill sets to stay competitive in their industry,” she said. “Attorneys with backgrounds in multiple fields can draw on their various experiences to approach issues holistically and comprehensively, better serving the client.”

  • Hannah R. Garry

    Newsweek

    April 5, 2022

    Re: Hannah R. Garry

    Hannah Garry was quoted in a story about Russian President Vladimir Putin and how, if he is tried for war crimes, he could be restricted from leaving Russia, allowed to travel only to countries that don't belong to the International Criminal Court. Travel restrictions would affect Putin's ability to engage in negotiations to end the war, she said, adding that negotiations could happen outside of the ICC's jurisdiction. "But it would be limited," she said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    USC Annenberg Media

    April 5, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the establishment of Amazon's first union in New York. “The percentage of unions in the workplace is under 10%... It means that management really has to comply with the law, but not so much listen to the workers," he said. "So this is going to change things and give workers more of a voice at the bargaining table.”

  • Jody David Armour

    LAist

    April 4, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about why so many of Los Angeles County DA George Gascón’s prosecutors want him to be recalled. "[Gascón's] new moral platform will be very different from the one that prosecutors themselves oftentimes have embraced for their entire career,” he said.

  • John Matsusaka

    The Journal Record

    April 4, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was interviewed about four joint resolutions that would make it more difficult for state questions to pass or be voted on. “The way I see it, this will just make everything more expensive,” he said. “And it could really make it where only really rich people or groups will be able to use this process.” Matsusaka was also cited in The Ardmoreite.

  • Stephen M. Rich

    Bloomberg Law

    March 30, 2022

    Re: Stephen M. Rich

    Stephen Rich was interviewed about how it’s too soon for Activision Blizzard Inc. to declare victory after securing an $18 million settlement with federal regulators over sexual harassment and discrimination allegations. “We also live in a #MeToo world, where employee interests are heightened by our sense that sex discrimination and sexual harassment aren’t just violations of economic rights but are violations of an individual’s dignity,” he said. “That may be a reason for a person to focus less on the immediate payout and more on making sure Activision is held accountable for the things that it did.”

  • Jody David Armour

    AP News

    March 30, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the implications of Will Smith not facing a charge for slapping Chris Rock. “How can what appears to be an obvious criminal act committed in the open publicly not result in any criminal consequences?” he asked. “Do different standards apply to celebrities and noncelebrities? Apparently, we seem to all recognize that is the case. But what does that recognition say to us about the legitimacy and credibility of our criminal justice system?” He was also cited in Billboard and ABC News.

  • Edward McCaffery

    CNN

    March 26, 2022

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Ed McCaffery wrote an op-ed arguing that governors have so much extra money, they're giving it away. "Some states are now simply giving the money back to taxpayers -- simply, if loudly," he wrote. "Georgia's Gov. Brian Kemp, facing a tough election year, this week very publicly signed a bill authorizing hundreds of dollars to be sent as income tax refunds to state residents who filed returns in 2020 and 2021, right around the time that they will be filing their federal taxes."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Oklahoma Watch

    March 23, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    The USC Initiative and Referendum Institute was cited in an article about a package of proposals that would make it harder for many state questions to pass. These types of requirements “can be a deterrent to the use of the initiative process,” said the Institute's report. The Institute was also cited in KGOU.

  • Clare Pastore

    Times of San Diego

    March 23, 2022

    Re: Clare Pastore

    Clare Pastore was interviewed about the lawyer for the Rebecca Zahau family who faces a $1,500 court fine and possible state Bar investigation after he apparently “ticked off” a Superior Court judge. “Oftentimes, you see judges sanctioning lawyers for $950, $990 — because they’re not trying to get the lawyer in trouble with the Bar,” she said. “For a judge to deliberately go this far above the reporting threshold is also unusual.”

  • Erik Hovenkamp

    The Hill

    March 21, 2022

    Re: Erik Hovenkamp

    Erik Hovenkamp and D. Daniel Sokol wrote an op-ed arguing that two recent bills pushing for antitrust reform missed the mark. "Not only would they cause immense economic damage, but they also fall woefully short of providing the kinds of reform that antitrust really needs," they wrote.

  • Jody David Armour

    Pasadena Star News

    March 17, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was cited in an article arguing that the methanol ban is harmful. “You cannot talk out of both sides of your mouth. You cannot agree that the Black community does not need more unjust interactions with police, yet also support bans and prohibitions that result in more police interactions, investigative stops, stop-question-frisk cases,” he said. The story also appeared in Daily Breeze.

  • Emily Ryo

    Scientific American

    March 16, 2022

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was cited and quoted in a story about her empirical study on the U.S. naturalization process indicating that naturalization adjudication outcomes are significantly different for many racial, ethnic, religious and gender groups. In the story, Ryo noted that she was struck by the discrepancies because federal law mandates that applicants be treated uniformly in the naturalization process. If the process were uniform, "we should not expect to see even small differences,” she said.

  • David B. Cruz

    NBC News

    March 14, 2022

    Re: David B. Cruz

    David Cruz was quoted in a story about the Idaho state legislature passing a bill punishing parents with life in prison for seeking gender-affirming health care for their transgender child. The bill also criminalizes cases of transgender children going to other states for certain medical procedures. The bill's constitutionality may be challenged, experts said. Cruz noted that the bill presents “complicated questions whether Idaho could, in that fashion, use their lawmaking authority to try to prevent people in Idaho from taking advantage of the differing law of another state.”

  • Jean Lantz Reisz

    Los Angeles Times

    March 14, 2022

    Re: Jean Lantz Reisz

    Jean Lantz Reisz was quoted in a story on a dispute over financing of hotels and an events center in Hollywood. The developers used EB-5, a federal program that gives visas to foreigners who invest in U.S. projects and create new jobs. Reisz said the investors have little control over how their money is used and federal program managers lack resources to oversee each project. “It’s been very subjectable to fraud,” she said.

  • Hannah R. Garry

    Insider

    March 9, 2022

    Re: Hannah R. Garry

    Hannah Garry was interviewed about how there's clear cut evidence of war crimes in Ukraine, but building a case against Putin will take years and it's unlikely he'll ever face justice. "It's typically not hard to show that on the ground war crimes are happening. What's hard to show is how the high-level leader is connected to it through some theory of responsibility," she said.

  • Hannah R. Garry

    The Hill

    March 4, 2022

    Re: Hannah R. Garry

    Hannah Garry wrote an op-ed arguing that the Senate can help Ukraine by confirming Beth Van Schaack now. "Van Schaack’s confirmation would build upon the overwhelming support of Ukraine’s allies for the prosecutor’s investigation by sending a clear signal to the world that the U.S. is ready to reclaim its historic leadership role in supporting justice for atrocity crimes, including at the ICC, even though the U.S. is not an ICC member," she wrote.

  • Franita Tolson

    NPR

    March 3, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about voter fraud. "The reasons why Trump's attempt to overturn the 2020 election failed is because there were state officials who refused to substantiate his claims of fraud," she said. "These folks really are gatekeepers."

  • Thomas Lenz

    Northern California Record

    March 2, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision to defer ruling on a California arbitration case, Chamber of Commerce v. Bonta, because the U.S. Supreme Court is now reviewing another California case, Viking v. Moriana, addressing how arbitration falls under the Federal Arbitration Act. "I think when the Supreme Court decides to take an issue, in an abundance of caution, a lower court may feel that there could be some impact,” he said. “And it could be viewed as really an act of prudence to see what the Supreme Court does.”

  • John Matsusaka

    Arizona Public Media

    March 2, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was interviewed about why Arizona embraced the initiative process. "In the early 20th century, there was this thing called the Progressive Movement, which came right after something called the Populist Movement, and these groups had a whole bunch of different types of things they wanted to accomplish, but they didn't think democracy was working very well," he said. "So a whole bunch of western states adopted the initiative referendum, and Arizona was part of that in 1912."

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Cannabis Business Times

    March 1, 2022

    Re: Julie Werner-Simon

    Julie Werner-Simon wrote an op-ed about the state of U.S. cannabis legalization in 2022. "The year 2022 will see more states come into the legalization fold – at least to some degree," she wrote. "With the laws (at the state and local level) changing almost weekly, operators would be well-advised to put a marijuana legalization expert on the payroll and find a state climate (figuratively and literally) that fits the bill."

  • Jody David Armour

    Los Angeles Times

    February 28, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the "George Gascón factor" in the upcoming L.A. mayoral race. The Gascón recall campaign was playing a kind of proxy role in the race, with supporters aiming to show that they’re “a traditional, tough-on-crime, law-and-order candidate” by calling for Gascón’s ouster.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    February 23, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about Starbucks continuing to press losing objections in what the union behind the campaign has criticized as an effort to slow its momentum through familiar delay tactics. Starbucks may have a cost-benefit decision to make if this pattern continues. In the face of mounting legal headwinds, a lot of companies would start to wonder what they're getting out of the approach, he said.

  • Emily Ryo

    CNN

    February 23, 2022

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed about how Black immigrants are more likely to be denied US citizenship than White immigrants. "For example, if Black immigrants might be more targeted by law enforcement than White immigrants, that disadvantage and targeting will become exaggerated over time as they try to seek citizenship," she said. Ryo was also cited in The Hill.

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The New Yorker

    February 23, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's new book, "American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York,” was mentioned in a review. American Shtetl "is an extraordinary and riveting account, based on fifteen years of research, of what has been, with the arguable exception of the state of Utah, the most triumphant separatist enclave in American history."

  • John Matsusaka

    The Current

    February 22, 2022

    Re: John Matsusaka

    John Matsusaka was interviewed about an upcoming special election in Camden County, Georgia in which residents will vote on just one issue: whether to repeal or let stand a county commission decision to purchase property for a planned spaceport. “Nobody’s going to spend their time collecting signatures and doing this unless there’s kind of widespread irritation at the thing,” he said. “So that’s, that’s why my guess is that when people put these things on the ballot, it’s usually risen to the level that they quite often pass.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Forward

    February 22, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book co-authored with David Myers was cited in an article about how a Hasidic village in New York is paving the way for a ‘white, Christian, conservative’ America. “It is also a community,” Myers and Stolzenberg write in conclusion, “that serves as a revealing mirror of American society, exposing deep roots and fissures in the animating ideas of this country.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Keen On

    February 18, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg was interviewed about on how a group of American Hasidic Jews established its own local government, with reference to her new book. "If enough residents in a particular area sign a petition and then put a proposal to form their own municipality, in this case a village, and a majority vote to approve that petition, they have their own local government."

  • D. Daniel Sokol

    The Globe and Mail

    February 18, 2022

    Re: D. Daniel Sokol

    D. Daniel Sokol was interviewed about antitrust measures in Canada. “Canada’s approach has always been ... wait and see what happens elsewhere," he said. "And there’s a certain second-mover advantage to that, because you don’t make the same mistakes that other jurisdictions make.” The article is behind a paywall.

  • Robin Craig

    Nebraska Public Media

    February 18, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about Nebraska's legal argument for the Perkins County Canal project. “Nebraska actually has a pretty good argument, because it’s there," she said. "These cases, when they get litigated, go directly to the U.S. Supreme Court, because it’s one state suing another. The U.S. Supreme Court tends to interpret these compacts like contracts between the states.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Los Angeles Review of Books

    February 17, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's new book, "American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York,” was mentioned in a review. "The fact-intensive story Myers and Stolzenberg captivatingly tell also permits the astute observer to extract an important insight of constitutional significance: religious minorities do not always lack the political power to protect their interests, as is often assumed."

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The Photo News

    February 16, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg was interviewed about her new book, "American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York.“ While writing the book, she asked herself “how liberal rights could be used to empower a religious community that rejects modern liberal values.”

  • Robin Craig

    InsideEPA.com

    February 16, 2022

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about how the Supreme Court's eventual ruling in a closely watched Clean Water Act (CWA) case may not provide the desired clarity on the law's scope and could instead create more confusion over the definition of waters of the United States (WOTUS) than already exists. On the whole, 9th Circuit case law "has been less than clear" on whether only the Kennedy test should be used or whether either the Kennedy or Scalia test can apply, she said. This article is behind a paywall.

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The Times of Israel

    February 10, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book co-authored with David Myers was cited in an article about the unexpected successes of Satmar Hasidim. “A brilliant, eye-opening, thought provoking, easy to read and enjoyable book by two university scholars, Nomi M. Stolzenberg of the University of Southern California, Gould School of Law who has written widely on law and religion, and David N. Myers of the University of California, Chair in Jewish History, whose many books include Jewish History: A Very Short Introduction.” The book was also mentioned in San Diego Jewish World.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    The Washington Post

    February 8, 2022

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    A report by the International Human Rights Clinic was cited in an article that debunked the myth that there is a causal relationship between large sporting events and an increase in sex trafficking. "A 2021 report by the USC Gould International Human Rights Clinic found that anti-trafficking efforts rely primarily on law enforcement 'raids' or 'sweeps.' These are 'largely ineffective' at preventing trafficking or protecting survivors, the report found, even though law enforcement typically portrays them as successful."

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    The New York Review of Books

    February 4, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book, American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York, was reviewed. The reviewer wrote that the book, co-written with David Myers, provides "an impressive charting of the legal, cultural and political machinery set in motion by the creation of a new religious settlement, which eventually became a bona fide municipality." The book was also reviewed in The Jerusalem Post.

  • Franita Tolson

    Daily Trojan

    February 2, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was mentioned in an article about USC's celebrations to kick off Black History Month. "After the national anthem, Harris introduced Folt, who spoke about the love and compassion Trojans have shown each other during the pandemic, USC’s and faculty’s anti-racism initiatives — including Vice Dean of the Gould School of Law Franita Tolson’s voting rights testimony on the Senate floor," the article said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Northern California Record

    January 31, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about a state Appellate Court's upholding of a lower court ruling involving time rounding claims. “Employers can rely on both of these rulings for authority but for different purposes,” he said. “The Supreme Court ruling sends a message that rounding is dangerous when it involves meal periods. But if it's not a common question among employees or among facilities of an employer, if things vary from one to another, that’s going to weigh against the common question needed for a class action.”

  • Thomas Lenz

    Northern California Record

    January 31, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about a state Appellate Court's upholding of a lower court ruling involving time rounding claims after finding that common questions must apply for a case to proceed to class action status. “Just because you don't have something in writing doesn't mean there is a common question that should be resolved in a class action format,” he said. “The absence of a written policy is not itself going to be reflective of an illegal act.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Identity/Crisis Podcast

    January 31, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book, American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York, was mentioned in a podcast. "How did a small contingent of Hasidic families establish a thriving, insular enclave with a powerful local government? [Authors Nomi Stolzenberg and David Myers] explore religious, social, and economic norms, delve into the roots of Satmar Hasidism, and uncover the American dream in the unlikeliest of places.

  • Thomas Lenz

    LAist

    January 26, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the legal right to sick days. “Even if the law doesn't require a particular leave or accommodation that an employee may want, it may be in the employer's best interest to work with that employee to achieve a solution that's going to keep that employee on board,” he said.

  • Franita Tolson

    Kenosha News

    January 24, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about Republicans' success in blocking voter rights legislation. "A lot of states have voter I.D. laws, but it's important to distinguish between types of voter I.D. laws to the extent that a state has a restrictive one," she said. "But what we saw in the wake of the Shelby County decision was states enacted more restrictive voter IDs, voter I.D. laws because they don't have to preclear with the federal government."

  • Jody David Armour

    The Orange County Register

    January 24, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour wrote an op-ed arguing for adjustment to how sentencing in California is viewed and carried out. "It is time for all of us to look in the mirror and confront these vestiges of our failed and cruel criminal justice history," he wrote. We will never achieve a just society until we do."

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Forward

    January 19, 2022

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg's book, American Shtetl: The Making of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic Village in Upstate New York, was mentioned in a list of the best Jewish TV, movies and books to look out for in 2022. "For 15 years, scholars Nomi M. Stolzenberg and David M. Myers have worked to tell the story of how a group of Yiddish-speaking Satmar Jews formed its own local government in Orange County, New York. With sympathy toward their widely misunderstood subject matter, the authors explore the Kiryas Joel Satmar community’s rapidly changing role in American politics, as well as its place in the American Jewish community."

  • Jody David Armour

    NBC Los Angeles

    January 18, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream. "Dr. King wasn't just fighting for a colorblind America, he was fighting for a just America."

  • Franita Tolson

    FOX 13

    January 17, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about how voting rights have changed since Martin Luther King. The provisions of the Freedom to Vote Act that are that are now a part of this mega bill are also important for everyday voters," she said. "If it passes, it's a completely new day for American democracy. That bill would be the most important voting bill since the Voting Rights Act of 1965."

  • Jody David Armour

    Pasadena Star News

    January 17, 2022

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the ongoing debate between attorneys and prosecutors about charging fentanyl-related deaths as murders. “I think there’s a moral problem with charging people who accidentally cause the death of another with murder," he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    January 14, 2022

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to shut down the Biden administration's controversial vaccine-or-testing mandate for private businesses with at least 100 employees. "A number of employers are celebrating that they don't have to do something ordered by the government," he said.

  • Franita Tolson

    NPR

    January 4, 2022

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about where candidates denying the results of the 2020 Presidential election are running to control voting. "The reasons why Trump's attempt to overturn the 2020 election failed is because there were state officials who refused to substantiate his claims of fraud," she said.

  • Robin Craig

    Law360

    December 17, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the Supreme Court's rejection of Misssissippi's bid to stop Tennessee from pumping groundwater out of an aquifer that sits beneath those and several other states. "While equitable apportionment in the Supreme Court is often not a satisfactory remedy, given the high burden of proof to show injury, states facing shared groundwater management issues and shortages now know that they can bargain through interstate compacts in the shadow of the equitable apportionment doctrine," she said.

  • D. Daniel Sokol

    ProMarket - University of Chicago

    December 14, 2021

    Re: D. Daniel Sokol

    D. Daniel Sokol co-authored, with Abraham L. Wickelgren, an opinion piece about the Federal Trade Commission undermining its ability to enforce antitrust laws by "minimizing the importance of expertise, democratic accountability and due process." "The increase in political polarization has now bled into antitrust, and the FTC has become political in a way that it had not been for more than a generation. This violates accepted norms of proper notice and comment and creates a sham version of input," Sokol and Wickelgren wrote.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360.com

    December 7, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was quoted in an article about how the rise of strike activity is bringing attention to the long-standing National Labor Relations Board precedent giving employers the freedom to permanently replace striking workers, a power that the agency's labor-friendly prosecutor is pushing to cut. "A change in policy would be a new day," Lenz said. "Unions would have a better ability to convince employees that by acting together and walking out that they can gain some leverage and not suffer for it."

  • Robin Craig

    Miami CBS News

    December 2, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted about more states considering bans on gas-powered lawn equipment. "I think the easier the manufacturers make it for other states to adopt the same sort of ban, the more states will do it," she said.

  • Emily Ryo

    lawandcrime.com

    December 1, 2021

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo's immigration study was featured in an article about changing the immigration strategy in the United States. In the study, Ryo gave three groups of respondents various information about how migrants were treated when they arrived at the border. The participants were then asked if they would still attempt to live in the U.S.

  • Robin Craig

    Law360.com

    December 1, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig wrote an expert analysis on the recent ruling of Mississippi v. Tennessee, the Supreme Court's first ever interstate groundwater dispute. "The decision could have long-ranging effects on interstate water negotiations for at least the rest of the century," said Craig. "Its influence is likely to be particularly acute in states where groundwater is becoming an increasingly important source of water, in light of climate change's disruptions to surface water supplies."

  • Robin Craig

    WKRC

    December 1, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted in an article about California becoming the first state to ban the sale of gas-powered lawn equipment in an effort to curb emissions. "We'll see how manufacturers react. I think the easier the manufacturers make it for other states to adopt the same sort of ban, the more states will do it," said Craig.

  • Robin Craig

    USC Annenberg Media

    November 30, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed in an article about the end of snow in the California Western mountains for the first time in 30 years. "Tt can have cascading impacts, obviously," said Craig. "That’s going to limit the water supply for drinking water and it’s going to limit water supply for agriculture.”

  • Robin Craig

    USC Annenberg Media

    November 29, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted in an article about the use and distribution of readily available, single-use plastic food-ware. "Will it solve the entire plastics problem? Obviously not. But will it start to make a dent? I think, yeah, I think it might," Craig said.

  • Jody David Armour

    CNN

    November 26, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was quoted in a story about the Milwaukee district attorney criticized when his office sought low cash bail for the driver who hit and kill parade participants in Waukesha, Wis. "You can't pin cash bail to the spike in violent crime because, for one thing, cash bail affects mainly low-level non-violent offenders," said Armour, quoted by CNN over the summer about a different issue.

  • Jody David Armour

    KCRW Press Play

    November 24, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the verdict in the Ahmaud Arbery case. “It's only happenstantial that Arbery’s video got out and it became part of a movement, that we are here to be thankful that the justice process was vindicated in this case," he said. "But it could very easily have gone another way. And that's something for us to pause on and not become too triumphalist when you have a verdict like this.”

  • Robin Craig

    90.3 WPLN News

    November 23, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about Mississippi losing a legal battle over groundwater to the city of Memphis. “There’s no factual record of Mississippi having wells dry up or not having the groundwater it needs available, and that’s what you’d have to show to show the kind of injury you’d need to get the equitable apportionment,” she said.

  • Robin Craig

    Time

    November 23, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted in an article about the Supreme Court decision in the battle between groundwater in Mississippi and Tennessee. "The unanimous ruling not only ended Mississippi and Tennessee’s long-running dispute, but also provided a framework for other legal battles that may emerge in the coming decades," says Craig.

  • Ariela Gross

    CBS Los Angeles

    November 11, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross' LA Times op-ed was mentioned in an article about protests at USC over recent days, mainly in response to the poor handling of sexual assault investigations – not only into Sigma Nu fraternity – but into the university as a whole. "Gross denounces the leadership of the university, claiming they have continued to enable the predatory behavior on campus," the article read.

  • Edward McCaffery

    Forbes

    November 11, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Ed McCaffery was interviewed for an article about how America's richest can access billions without selling their stock. “It’s perfectly legal, and it's a little hard to say it's immoral. Like, it's immoral to own a growth stock? It's immoral to borrow money?” he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    KALW Your Legal Rights

    November 10, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about new labor and employment laws passed in 2021. "We expect California law to provide for more rights than under federal law," he said. "California always raises the bar; this is another example."

  • Ariela Gross

    FOX 11 Los Angeles

    November 9, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed about USC's toxic culture. "By saying 'culture,' the University makes it sound as though it is a broad issue of general responsibility of all community members," she said. "I think that we have an administrative culture of secrecy, denial, euphemisms and impunity for wrongdoers."

  • Ariela Gross

    Daily Trojan

    November 9, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross's LA Times op-ed was mentioned in an article about President Folt's recent community-wide email. "The FAQs did not directly address Gross’ statement that USC has not released reports about Tyndall or former medical school dean Dr. Carmen Puliafito," said the article.

  • Ariela Gross

    Los Angeles Times

    November 3, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross wrote an op-ed about the USC administration's toxic culture. "The culture of the USC administration is rotten from the top," she wrote. "What will it take for that to change?"

  • Elyn Saks

    India Education Diary

    November 2, 2021

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was interviewed about co-winning the prestigious Pardes Humanitarian Prize. “I am humbled and deeply honored to receive the Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Health,” she said. “The Brain and Behaviour Research Foundation makes extraordinary contributions improving the lives of people living with mental illness, and advancing our understanding of mental health.”

  • Joseph Longo

    Los Angeles Times

    November 2, 2021

    Re: Joseph Longo

    Joseph Longo was quoted in an article about the complications the MLB may face if LA Dodgers pitcher Trevor Bauer appeals his suspension from MLB for allegations of sexual misconduct. "You’ve got to interpret what’s written in the policy. Both sides will try to put their explanation on the policy, and then the arbitrator has to make a decision,” he said.

  • Jody David Armour

    Davis Vanguard Everyday Injustice

    November 1, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed on his perspective on D.A. Boudin’s response to justice reform. “As a politician, running for elective office [especially in the position of District Attorney] is one of the most important kinds of executive type politicians out there…I was really heartened to hear the points he was hitting. I think those are the places we need to go,” he said.

  • Erik Hovenkamp

    Promarket/University of Chicago

    October 28, 2021

    Re: Erik Hovenkamp

    Erik Hovenkamp wrote an op-ed on tech platforms and the antitrust duty to deal. "Antitrust experts have long recognized that, although a firm should not be penalized for earning a monopoly on the merits, it is not entitled to exploit that monopoly to impair competition in other markets," he wrote.

  • Gregory Keating

    Reuters

    October 27, 2021

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was quoted in an article about who faces legal liability in 'Rust' shooting case. "It's pretty obvious; somebody had to be negligent," he said. He was also quoted in msn.com.

  • Gregory Keating

    France 24

    October 27, 2021

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about the legal implications fo the Alec Baldwin shooting. "He appears to have reasonably believed that this was not a loaded weapon," he said.

  • Christopher D. Stone

    Christopher Stone

    October 26, 2021

    Re: Christopher D. Stone

    Christopher Stone was mentioned in a podcast episode about giving legal rights to nature. "In his argument, Stone noted that other non-human entities had legal rights — such as corporations, universities, trusts, and governments — and he compared this to the civil rights movement, women’s suffrage, and giving children rights."

  • Edward McCaffery

    CNN

    October 26, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Ed McCaffery wrote an op-ed about how Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and other billionaires should be taxed. "My preferred idea is for a progressive spending tax, which would tax all Americans when they spend, not when they work, save, give or die," he wrote.

  • Gregory Keating

    Los Angeles Times

    October 24, 2021

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about the legal fallout from the Alec Baldwin prop gun shooting. “Somebody has to have been negligent,” he said. “This doesn’t happen without negligence. There are safety protocols that are supposed to be followed. It’s really just a matter of who’s negligent and how the responsibility gets parceled out. Then it gets murky because the facts are murky.” He was also quoted in Yahoo!.

  • Jody David Armour

    Wired

    October 20, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour's book N*gga Theory: Race, Language, Unequal Justice, and the Law was mentioned in an article about cancel culture.

  • Gregory Keating

    NBC Los Angeles

    October 14, 2021

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about a woman's claims that Amazon should take action against scams. "If scammers got Amy's phone number through and Amazon data breach, then the lawsuit might have legs," he said. "But there's no evidence that happened."

  • Robin Craig

    Straight Arrow News

    October 13, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the aftermath of the recent pipeline spill into the Pacific Ocean. She said even after financial liability is determined, an oil spill’s impact is difficult to quantify. “How much does it cost to clean up an otter,” she asked. “How much does it cost to rehabilitate a traumatized otter?”

  • Robin Craig

    Bloomberg

    October 13, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about the fight between Mississippi and Tennessee over ground water. "This is the first case to reach the Supreme Court arguing about groundwater," she said.

  • Franita Tolson

    The Guardian

    October 11, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about how the chief justice no longer sits in supreme court’s ideological center and has lost the power to cast the deciding vote in any ruling. “The cases in this term do not give [John Roberts] an easy out to be an institutionalist and trying to build a coalition, versus him indulging his personal preferences. And overturning Roe v Wade might be his personal preference," she said. "And if it is, it’s still the Roberts court.”

  • Gregory Keating

    San Fernando Valley Business Journal

    October 11, 2021

    Re: Gregory Keating

    Gregory Keating was interviewed about the ongoing 2015 Aliso gas leak settlement. "The big issue here is whether there will be injuries down the road, whether it will be possible to trace causal connections between those injuries and the leak; and whether people who, say, die prematurely as a result of this leak will get the reparation they should get," he said. This article is behind a paywall.

  • Robin Craig

    KUAF

    October 8, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted about how the outcome of Mississippi's legal dispute with Memphis could impact other groundwater conflicts. “It’s either going to be the shortest interstate water law case opinion in the history of the court, or they are going to make some broader pronouncements about where they think equitable apportionment applies and doesn’t apply,” she said.

  • Ariela Gross

    LA Times

    October 7, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was quoted in an article about the investigation of George Tyndall. “I certainly think anyone who has the authority to do so should look further, especially when it comes to criminal matters involving George Tyndall. It surprises me there wasn’t a more thorough investigation,” she said.

  • Robin Craig

    Courthouse News Service

    October 6, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was quoted in an article about a rare Supreme Court case over shared groundwater in Mississippi and Tennessee. “This is really the first time that two states are before the U.S. Supreme Court saying . . . how do we treat groundwater? Is it like a river, where we know we either do an interstate compact or, if we go to the court, we're asking for equitable apportionment? Or is it something else,” Craig said. “And Mississippi has pretty much against all advice from everyone in just insisting that, no, it's something else.”

  • Robin Craig

    The Orange County Register

    October 5, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig was interviewed about a civil lawsuit filed in regards to an oil spill that has been washing up in Orange Country since the weekend. “If your entire goal is to prevent pollution off the coast, you’re going to take a different approach to what the penalties should be than if you take into consideration the broader economic role of petroleum. There does seem to be a trend of not prioritizing preventative measures," she said. Additional coverage also appeared in The San Bernardino Sun.

  • Franita Tolson

    ABC News

    October 5, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was quoted in an article about the strict voter identification laws in Texas. "Texas has a very restrictive voter ID law. If you read it, it doesn't seem racist on its face, but if you think about how it operates in practice, as well as the intent behind it, it is fairly racist. For example, Texas' law only allows voters to have a certain limited amount of IDs. You have to have a driver's license, you can have a hand handgun license, you can have a military ID, but you can't have a federal ID, or you can't have a student ID, which are the types of IDs that people of color are more likely to have," she said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    October 1, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the new Democratic majority settling in at the National Labor Relations Board and preparing for a policy shift. "I'm telling clients and colleagues that whatever the legal standard is right now, that's all well and good, but ... you might be wise to consider where the law is going," he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    USA Today

    October 1, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees strike. "A 'yes' vote from union members puts them in a good bargaining position, something they can deploy if they need to," he said. "Producers don't really want a disruption in the product they put out, and workers don't want to go long without pay. They could get back to the bargaining table."

  • Michael Jenkins

    Laguna Beach Independent

    October 1, 2021

    Re: Michael Jenkins

    Michael Jenkins was interviewed about an investigation into alleged violations of the Brown Act by Laguna Beach city councilmembers. “The DA will then decide what to do – it can drop the matter, issue a caution or proceed with a formal proceeding, such as a civil or criminal prosecution,” he said. “Criminal prosecutions are rare and the burden of proof is high.”

  • Dorothy S. Lund

    Bloomberg Law

    October 1, 2021

    Re: Dorothy S. Lund

    Dorothy Lund was interviewed about a new SEC proposal that would trigger greater investor scrutiny about how their proxy ballot votes correspond to their environmental, social, and governance claims. “There’s a strong need for more transparency on what mutual funds are doing with their votes,” she said. “There’s a lot of talk these days about BlackRock on sustainability, Vanguard on climate.”

  • Robin Craig

    SCOTUS Blog

    October 1, 2021

    Re: Robin Craig

    Robin Craig wrote an article about how justices will hear Mississippi’s complaint that Tennessee is stealing its groundwater. "The key legal issue in Mississippi v. Tennessee, therefore, is whether the equitable apportionment doctrine (automatically) applies to groundwater resources," she wrote.

  • Elyn Saks

    KNX 1070 In Depth

    September 29, 2021

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was interviewed about John Hinckley Jr. "I think it matters who a victim is," she said. "It shouldn't really because it doesn't really go to someone's culpability or blame-worthiness."

  • Lisa Klerman

    CBS Los Angeles

    September 27, 2021

    Re: Lisa Klerman

    Lisa Klerman was interviewed about how COVID-19 vaccination rates among the LAPD and LAFD are well behind LA county residents. “States and local governments, they have the power to regular public health before the Constitution was even ratified,” she said.

  • Franita Tolson

    CNN

    September 22, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was mentioned as a participant in a Senate hearing on voting rights. "Apologies Mr. Cruz, your state of Texas, perhaps," she said, when Cruz asked which voter ID laws are racist. "The fact that the voter ID law was put into place to diminish the political power of Latinos with racist intent." Tolson was also quoted in The Washington Post, USA TODAY, Independant, The Hill and Yahoo! News.

  • Brian Peck

    LLM Guide

    September 21, 2021

    Re: Brian Peck

    Brian Peck was interviewed about how heightened geopolitical tensions have made the need for trade law specialists more acute than ever. “There is a growing need for trade lawyers to help clients navigate and comply with the increasingly complex multilateral regulatory network of international and domestic trade laws,” he said.

  • Heidi Rummel

    Los Angeles Times

    September 13, 2021

    Re: Heidi Rummel

    Heidi Rummel was interviewed about Sirhan Sirhan’s possible parole. “The faction that’s saying it’s unfair to release him should be arguing with California sentencing laws,” she said. “It’s not an argument with the parole board.”

  • Nomi Stolzenberg

    Los Angeles Times

    September 13, 2021

    Re: Nomi Stolzenberg

    Nomi Stolzenberg was interviewed about the opposition of LAPD employees to the vaccine mandate. Employers can turn down a religious exemption if they can demonstrate that it is insincere, but “no one has actually figured out a way to test the sincerity of a person who claims they have religious objections,” she said. As a result, employers have largely deferred to “religious exemptions on demand.”

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    September 2, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the end of the National Labor Relations Board's Trump era. "I thought it really did a disservice to the employees, the subject matter of their discussions, and when something is going to be considered protected and when it won't," he said. "I think it promotes confusion."

  • Emily Ryo

    Phys.org

    September 2, 2021

    Re: Emily Ryo

    Emily Ryo was interviewed about how her personal experience with immigration influences studies on migrant experience. "My main motivation going to law school was to see if I could help my family," she said. "I went on to get a Ph.D. because I wanted to explore the migrant experience, not just for people living in the U.S. but for people living abroad dreaming of coming to the U.S. and establishing new lives here."

  • Jody David Armour

    FOX 11 Los Angeles

    August 28, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about how Robert F. Kennedy's assassin was granted parole. "It's a sign of the times. We've been in a debate over the last couple years about what criminal justice should look like and what conception of justice should determine our criminal justice policy, and should it be rooted in retribution, retaliation and revenge or in redemption, restoration and rehabilitation," he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Mottek on Money

    August 26, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about Proposition 22. "The thrust of the lawsuit that Prop. 22 was unconditional," he said. "Basically the reasons that the proposition was determined to be unconstitutional are that the proposition interfered with worker's compensation law and the rights of the individuals performing work for Uber, Lyft, etc. to form or join a labor union."

  • Abby K. Wood

    ABC 7

    August 19, 2021

    Re: Abby K. Wood

    Abby Wood was interviewed about the 2021 California gubernatorial recall election. "If you want to keep the governor in office, but you think, 'if my side doesn't win, I want a say in who replaces them,' you should go ahead and answer question two," she said. "It will not void your dislike of the recall in question one."

  • Jody David Armour

    WTTW

    August 15, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviwed about police leaders’ claims that bail reform is responsible for the surge in violence. “You can’t pin cash bail to the spike in violent crime because, for one thing, cash bail affects mainly low-level non-violent offenders,” he said. Armour was also quoted in KAKE.

  • Jonathan Barnett

    Bloomberg Law

    August 11, 2021

    Re: Jonathan Barnett

    Jonathan Barnett wrote an op-ed about startup exit strategies in the new antitrust era. "If an emergent firm represents a small portion of a much larger market, the transaction is unlikely to increase the acquirer’s market power, and hence, consumer harm is unlikely," he wrote. "For dealmakers, this means that startup acquisitions have generally raised little concern over regulatory intervention that would delay or preclude closing."

  • Daniel Klerman

    Washington Post

    August 10, 2021

    Re: Daniel Klerman

    Dan Klerman co-wrote an op-ed with Anja Shortland, professor of political economy at King’s College London, about Hobby Lobby's owner's gray-market artifacts. "The Museum of the Bible is now setting an example for responsible ownership of foreign cultural heritage," they wrote. "Perhaps this will change social norms further, spurring other museums to “choose” to send disputed acquisitions back to the countries from which they were taken."

  • Thomas Lenz

    CNBC

    August 9, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about vaccine mandates. “We see that employers are as concerned with what they perceive as a skill shortage, a labor shortage, as anything in deciding whether to mandate the vaccinations,” he said. “And for that reason, employers don’t want to scare people away, as they feel they might be able to accommodate and keep the workforce in some other way.”

  • Eileen Decker

    Maui Now

    August 5, 2021

    Re: Eileen Decker

    Eileen Decker was interviewed about new legislation to fight cybercrime and help keep Americans safe from online scams. “Comprehensive cybercrime data will help ensure robust training and increased resources to law enforcement to investigate cybercrimes, and improved public awareness about the pervasiveness of the cybercrime problem," she said. "This bill is an important step to achieving these goals.”

  • Franita Tolson

    New York Times

    August 4, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed on debates over the Constitution. “We became reliant on the courts to do what the amendment process couldn’t do,” she said.

  • Ariela Gross

    Law360

    August 4, 2021

    Re: Ariela Gross

    Ariela Gross was interviewed at the American Bar Association's panel about racial bias in law. "We unfortunately see echoes of this era not only in the onslaught of voting restrictions that have been passed in many southern states but in efforts to sanitize and whitewash this era of racist violence and disenfranchisement," she said.

  • Elyn Saks

    AP News

    July 30, 2021

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks wrote an expert analysis about Britney Spears' conservatorship. "Keeping Britney and others safe does not mean that they cannot be free to make decisions about their own lives," she wrote. The analysis also appeared in San Antonio Express-News, Tulsa World, Britannica, Metropolitan Digital, The National Interest, Faribault Daily News, The New Zealand Herald and PennLive Patriot-News. The analysis originally appeared in The Conversation.

  • USC Gould School of Law

    Business Insider

    July 30, 2021

    Re: USC Gould School of Law

    Jonathan Handel was quoted on how the key to resolving the lawsuit could be determining what constitutes a “typical” wide release.

  • Franita Tolson

    Notre Dame News

    July 29, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was a witness at a hearing featuring Luis Fraga's testimony that federal government commitment is necessary to protect voting rights for historically marginalized people. “The practice-based preclearance provision isolates those practices that states have historically used to abridge or deny the right to vote, and it does so without singling out any particular jurisdiction or geographic area,” she said.

  • Clare Pastore

    The Washington Post

    July 28, 2021

    Re: Clare Pastore

    Clare Pastore was interviewed about the Activision Blizzard lawsuit. “The DFEH would want to take on cases to set precedents, against particularly bad actors, if there are lot of complaints about the same employer, or to send a wake up call to the industry," she said.

  • Michael Jenkins

    Los Angeles Times

    July 27, 2021

    Re: Michael Jenkins

    Michael Jenkins was interviewed about a potential COVID-19 vaccine mandate for city workers. “From a legal perspective, if you can accommodate someone who otherwise is resisting compulsory vaccination, it gives them less to argue about [in court]," he said. “It essentially narrows the potential for a lawsuit.” Jenkins was also quoted in Newsweek.

  • Jody David Armour

    KCRW Greater LA

    July 26, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about the Ed Buck federal trial. “That's the equivalent kind of a punishment that you get for a second-degree homicide in a lot of states, for example," he said of the charge against Buck. "You're punished as a murderer. And so all the prosecution has to prove is that you knowingly distributed the meth. They don't have to prove that you distributed with the intent to cause death or serious bodily injury or anything else.”

  • Ankit Shah

    Los Angeles Times

    July 26, 2021

    Re: Ankit Shah

    Ankit Shah was interviewed about HIPAA is and is not. “I think that the major thing for people to understand with regard to HIPAA is that it’s very specific,” he said. “Healthcare entities have your information and are prohibited from sharing it without your consent. That’s it. That’s HIPAA.”

  • Thomas Lenz

    Northern California Record

    July 26, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about a federal appeals court ruling that statutory claims are subject to arbitration agreement. "The court seems to want to establish a pretty broad, arbitration-friendly rule here that is based on the terms of the agreement itself and not whether the employee in fact understood the agreement to mean one thing or another,” he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Law360

    July 26, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about the Democrats' plan to penalize labor violaters. "When you add fines to the mix, it's going to create a more adversarial system," he said.

  • Franita Tolson

    PolitiFact

    July 21, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about restrictive voting laws. "We no longer live in the time of poll taxes and literacy tests," she said. "It's way more subtle now."

  • Edward McCaffery

    MarketWatch

    July 19, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery was interviewed about the term ‘Buy, Borrow, Die,’ and how debt destabilized Haiti. “Need debt, you get screwed, don’t need debt you can use it as a tool to screw the government and everybody else,” he said.

  • Edward McCaffery

    MarketWatch

    July 16, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery was interviewed about how the wealthy use debt in their favor. "Need debt, you get screwed, don’t need debt you can use it as a tool to screw the government and everybody else," he said.

  • Dwight Stirling

    USA Today

    July 14, 2021

    Re: Dwight Stirling

    Dwight Stirling was interviewed about the Pentagon's move to address sexual assault in National Guard, after years of failing to do so. Stirling said that the recommendations set forth by the Defense Department task force report should be “immediately implemented as of yesterday. They are woefully overdue.”

  • Hannah R. Garry

    The New York Times

    July 13, 2021

    Re: Hannah R. Garry

    Hannah Garry was quoted in an article about a United Nations decision to set up a panel of experts to investigate systemic racism in policing against people of African descent. The panel stems from a U.N. human rights office report analyzing the deaths of 190 people of African descent, mostly in the U.S., highlighting lack of accountability for police killings and urging change. “It’s a very important step forward,” said Garry. “I see this international mechanism as a precursor to a future commission of inquiry.”

  • Edward McCaffery

    The Wall Street Journal

    July 13, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery was interviewed about how rich Americans live off their paper wealth. “Ordinary people don’t think about debt the way billionaires think about debt,” he said. “Once you’re already rich, it’s simple, it’s easy. It’s just buy, borrow, die. These are planks of the law that have been in place for 100 years.”

  • Misa Shimotsu-Kim

    Bloomberg

    July 13, 2021

    Re: Misa Shimotsu-Kim

    Misa Shimotsu was quoted in a press release about the expansion of the Media and Entertainment Law certificate to Master's students. “We are thrilled to extend our Media and Entertainment Law certificate to our on-campus MSL and MDR students at USC Gould,” said Shimotsu. “USC and Los Angeles are at the center of the entertainment industry, and our courses will be led by leaders and decision-makers who teach immediately applicable skills in entertainment law that can be utilized across a broad range of roles and organizations.” The press release also appeared in Yahoo Finance, LexBlog, Citizen Tribune (TN), Odisha Expo (India), Chronicle Tribune (IN), Valdosta Daily Times and Argus Press.

  • Jody David Armour

    Observer-Dispatch

    July 12, 2021

    Re: Jody David Armour

    Jody Armour was interviewed about Bill Cosby's release. It wasn’t just a technicality but "gross prosecutorial abuse" that eventually set Cosby free, he said. That misconduct landed him “in a cage” for two years. Armour said it’s “hard to say what is appropriate" as far as Cosby's punishment, but he believes two years imprisonment “is about right.”

  • Niels W. Frenzen

    Mirage News

    July 12, 2021

    Re: Niels W. Frenzen

    Niels Frenzen was mentioned in an article about a USC analysis of death reports for people who died in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody.

  • Edward McCaffery

    Daily Beast

    July 9, 2021

    Re: Edward McCaffery

    Edward McCaffery was interviewed about the implications of the Trump Organization indictment. If the whole organization were “infected” with “tax-evasion fever,” McCaffery said, and if prosecutors could establish that picture, it would be easier to climb the net to other executives. “The question here is, what’s the exposure to the executives on the organization side,” he said.

  • Thomas Lenz

    Mottek on Money

    July 8, 2021

    Re: Thomas Lenz

    Thomas Lenz was interviewed about regulations in the workplace as COVID restrictions begin to loosen. "Employees are allowed to impose stricter guidelines," he said. "If an employer wants to require face coverings, they can do so."

  • Franita Tolson

    The Guardian

    July 7, 2021

    Re: Franita Tolson

    Franita Tolson was interviewed about Trumps "big lie" and voting restrictions. “The fact that the January 6 insurrection didn’t scare us and prompt many Republicans to start aggressively rejecting those claims, and instead Republicans continue to embrace those claims as a justification for imposing additional restrictions means that our democracy remains in real trouble,” she said.

  • Camille Gear Rich

    Orange County Register

    July 6, 2021

    Re: Camille Gear Rich

    Camille Gear Rich was interviewed about the debate on critical race theory. “Most law students don’t even learn critical race theory,” she said. “Critical race theory talks about things like how the construct of whiteness informed constitutional doctrine. It talks about intersectionality — how multiple identities come together to create unique experiences of bias. It talks about how bias intersects with identity and causes injustice.”

  • Elyn Saks

    Elle

    July 4, 2021

    Re: Elyn Saks

    Elyn Saks was interviewed about Britney Spears' conservatorship. “I think it’s a really difficult, hard issue, and we want to do right by people and get them care," she said. "And we also want to do right by people in giving them the ability to exercise choice as much as they can.”

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

The New York Times
July 1, 2022
Re: Lee Epstein

Lee Epstein was quoted in a story about the six-justice majority on the U.S. Supreme Court, which has handed down decisions with a powerful impact on Americans and is considered by some the most conservative court since 1931. “The data provide stunning confirmation of the Republican-conservative takeover of the Supreme Court,” Epstein said.

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Felipe Jiménez
August, 2022

"Legal Positivism for Legal Officials," Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence.

Robin Craig
August, 2022

"Tribal Water Rights and Tribal Health: The Klamath Tribes and the Navajo Nation During the COVID-19 Pandemic," St. Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy (Forthcoming 2023).

Robin Craig
August, 2022

"Remembering the Ocean in Water Law," chapter for A Research Agenda for Water Law.